The Best Dogs for Kids: Finding the Ultimate Furry Friend

By Max Turner 6 Min Read

The Best Dogs for Kids: Finding the Ultimate Furry Friend

There’s no such thing as a bad dog—but some breeds are just better for kids than others. When choosing the best dogs for kids, it’s important to factor in breed temperament, size, age and energy level. With the right factors in mind, you can find the perfect pooch for your family!

Choosing the Right Size Dog

When it comes to size, it’s important to consider the size of your home, the size of your children, and how much upkeep you’re willing to put in. Here’s a quick guide to size-selection when it comes to kids and dogs:

Small-Sized Dogs: Small-sized dogs are great for kids because they require less upkeep—but can still provide plenty of love and fun. Small-sized breeds include Chihuahuas, Yorkies, Bichons Frises, Pugs, and Boston Terriers.

Medium-Sized Dogs: Medium-sized dogs are great for those families that have an average-sized home, or who want a pup with a bit more oomph. Medium breeds include Beagles, Bulldogs, Australian Shepherds, and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.

Large-Sized Dogs: Large-sized dogs need lots of space and plenty of upkeep. They’re great for outdoor adventures and larger families, but may be too overwhelming for some kids. Breeds like Labradors, German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, and Great Danes are all large-sized.

Temperament

Temperament is one of the most important things to consider when it comes to finding the best dogs for kids. Some breeds are a bit more rambunctious than others, whereas some are quite docile. Here’s a quick look at breed temperament:

Friendly and Playful:

  • Golden Retriever
  • Labrador Retriever
  • Collie
  • Beagle
  • Poodle
  • Bulldog
  • Basset Hound

Energetic and Outgoing:

  • German Shepherd
  • Jack Russell Terrier
  • Border Collie
  • Vizsla
  • Siberian Husky
  • Weimaraner
  • Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Laid-Back and Relaxed:

  • Dachshund
  • Bichon Frise
  • Pug
  • Cocker Spaniel
  • Shih Tzu
  • Havanese
  • Maltese
  • Newfoundland

Age of the Dog

When it comes to age, there are two main categories to consider: puppies and adults. Puppies are just as cute and cuddly as they sound—but they’re also a lot of work. From house-training to providing plenty of attention and socialization, puppies require plenty of time and energy. On the plus side, you get to see your pup grow up and form his own personality.

Adults, on the other hand, require less work overall. They’re usually house-trained, know a few tricks, and may even get along with other pets in the house. That being said, adults can sometimes be difficult to integrate into a family, as they may have a history of stress or have been subjected to neglect.

In the end, the decision of which age to choose really depends on your own time, energy, and lifestyle.

Energy-Level

When selecting the best dogs for kids, it’s important to think about energy-level. High-energy dogs require daily exercise, while low-energy dogs can be content with a few short walks a day. Here’s a quick look at high- and low-energy dog breeds:

High-Energy Breeds:

  • Australian Cattle Dog
  • Border Collie
  • German Shorthaired Pointer
  • Labrador Retriever
  • Vizsla
  • Weimaraner
  • Siberian Husky

Low-Energy Breeds:

  • Basset Hound
  • Bulldog
  • Shih Tzu
  • Pug
  • Cocker Spaniel
  • Bichon Frise
  • Newfoundland

Overall Health

When selecting a breed for your family, it’s also important to consider the overall health of the breed. Some dogs have a higher risk of developing certain illnesses or diseases, so it’s important to do some research about the breed before committing to one. Here’s a quick guide to common health issues seen in specific breeds:

Pugs: Pugs are prone to develop issues with their eyes, skin, and airways.

Bulldogs: Bulldogs tend to suffer from allergies, joint problems, and respiratory issues.

Golden Retrievers: Golden Retrievers are prone to hip dysplasia and skin allergies.

Basset Hounds: Basset Hounds may suffer from eye problems and ear infections.

Cocker Spaniels: Cocker Spaniels are prone to developing eye problems and hip dysplasia.

Beagles: Beagles may suffer from ear infections and seizures.

Labradors: Labradors may suffer from joint and muscle problems, as well as eye issues.

Conclusion

When it comes to finding the best dogs for kids, there are a lot of factors to consider. Size, temperament, age, energy, and overall health should all be taken into account when selecting a breed for your family. By keeping these factors in mind, you can be sure to find the ultimate furry friend for your kids!

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Max Turner is a passionate American dog lover and writer, dedicated to sharing his knowledge and experiences through his blog, WeLoveDogs.com. With a lifelong fascination for dogs and a strong bond with his own furry friends, Max offers valuable insights and practical tips to dog owners and enthusiasts worldwide. His blog covers a wide range of topics, including training techniques, health and wellness, breed profiles, responsible ownership, and fun activities. Max's engaging writing style, combined with his expertise and genuine love for dogs, make WeLoveDogs.com an invaluable resource for anyone looking to enhance their relationship with their canine companions. Max Turner's blog, WeLoveDogs.com, is a go-to destination for dog enthusiasts seeking expert advice and valuable insights. Max's deep-rooted passion for dogs, coupled with his extensive knowledge of dog behavior, training, health care, and breeds, enables him to provide practical tips and guidance. From training techniques and health tips to breed spotlights and responsible ownership, Max covers it all. With engaging content and a commitment to promoting a fulfilling and joyous life with dogs, WeLoveDogs.com is a trusted resource for dog owners looking to strengthen their bond with their furry friends.
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